Monthly Archives: October 2016

Upcoming Event! Understanding and Handling Inclusive Teaching

 

Wednesday, November 2, 2016   |   Lincoln Center, McMahon Hall, Room 206   |   1:30 – 2:30 p.m.

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Interested in developing your pedagogy skills?

As campus and national events play out in the news, it is more important than ever to engage in discussion of diversity in our community. Join us for a presentation and discussion on diversity and pedagogy at Fordham.

While the classroom can be a space for open, respectful discussion of sensitive or controversial topics – such as those related to identity and inequality, religious beliefs, or political ideologies – facilitating such discussions can be a challenging prospect.

 What is Inclusive Teaching?

 Inclusive teaching and learning refers to modes of teaching and learning that are designed to actively engage, include, and challenge all students. The practice of inclusive teaching can help instructors broaden and expand their understanding of their own disciplines and of what they hope to accomplish in teaching and in research.

Learn how to:

  • Include Diverse Content, Materials, and Ideas in the Classroom
  • Create an Inclusive Environment
  • Encourage a Growth Mindset
  • Strive for Equality of Access to Instruction and Assistance
  • Use Feedback to Refine and Improve your Methods

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October 27, 2016 · 8:11 pm

“Living Humanities” Ph.D. Grant Project Kicks Off at Fordham!

The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded GSAS and Fordham University a Next Generation Humanities PhD grant for the project entitled “The “Living Humanities” Ph.D. for the 21st Century.” For more on this project, see its website.

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The inaugural meeting of “The ‘Living Humanities’ PhD for the 21st Century” project took place on Friday, October 14. The meeting started on a somewhat bleak note – the unhappiness of graduate students. In his introductory talk, featured speaker Leonard Cassuto highlighted that, in the current plan of graduate education in the humanities, professors teach graduate students to want something that their professors can’t supply – the tenure-track academic position – so they’re effectively teaching their students to be unhappy. Drawing on two chapters from his 2015 book, The Graduate School Mess: What Caused It and How We Can Fix It, “Admissions” and “Conclusion: In Search of an Ethic,” Cassuto charted how we got to this point, giving a snapshot of graduate education and job placement since the 1950s. Most damningly, he suggested that current doctoral education is designed for people who could be the grandparents of our current students – the doctoral candidates who graduated during an academic job boom in the 1950s and 60s.

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Having established this pressing need for change in doctoral education, the meeting then turned to how we can change, focusing on five key questions:

  • How can we connect what we teach with what our students do with their degrees?
  • How can we embrace the teaching mission of graduate study?
  • Should the PhD be reconceived with skills-based approaches, and what would these skills be?
  • What are the goals for the PhD degree, and what would it mean to reconceive doctoral education in the humanities as liberal education?
  • How should the PhD go public?

Meeting participants engaged in a World Café format, discussing these questions in groups of five and taking copious notes to share with the group.

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With these discussions, the tone of the meeting became a lot more uplifting, with participants discussing ways to make change and programs that had already started this process. Participants questioned what students get out of their degrees – how do we connect how we teach with what our students do with their degrees? What skills do students develop during the PhD? They also debated how to balance discipline-specific requirements with more universal skills – should graduate education be skills or content-driven (and is this an either/or question)? Are the disciplines dinosaurs? A common theme across the five topics that merits further exploration was what students actually do once they graduate from PhDs – are there recognizable categories of non-academic jobs that students go to? What options are available to humanities PhD graduates, and what do employers outside the academy value from a humanities doctoral education?

One key theme across the topics was the value of collaboration and interdisciplinarity. Many participants emphasized the value of collaborative assignments for students, but also encouraging students to look beyond their departments for resources and providing teaching opportunities that weren’t just field-specific. They also highlighted current initiatives across the GSAS that help prepare graduate students for a range of positions, such as the proseminar for first-year students in Philosophy that provides professional orientation, or the Teaching Practicum in the English department that prepares graduates to teach at a range of institutions. New initiatives were also mentioned, like the Preparing Future Faculty program at GSAS and a proposed Eloquentia Perfecta seminar in Public Communication for graduate students across the humanities.

Other resources from outside Fordham were also suggested. In a discussion of post-PhD careers, one participant suggested the “Humanities Unbound” project, which promotes careers beyond tenure-track academic jobs and investigates what alt-ac activities are already being pursued by graduate students and academics across the US (see this paper by Katarina Rogers from the University of Virginia for details). In a discussion of internship opportunities for PhD students, several people mentioned the MLA’s Connected Academics Proseminar for alternate careers to academia, currently in its second year. In a discussion of taking scholarly research public, the “Knowledge Unlatched” portal was mentioned, which hosts Open Access publications that are proposed by publishers and then supported by libraries.

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Throughout the meeting, participants highlighted avenues for improvement and expressed a strong desire to implement such changes. They also considered both potential gains and losses from the evolution of graduate education, and emphasized the need for humility in looking to new models. The practicality, enthusiasm, and wealth of suggestions from PhD students and graduates across disciplines and careers set a promising precedent for “The ‘Living Humanities’ PhD for the 21st Century” project’s ongoing mission this year.

  • Samantha Sabalis, Graduate Assistant, NEH/GSAS Grant, The “Living Humanities” Ph.D. for the 21st Century

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Filed under "Living Humanities" Ph.D., Eva Badowska, Fellowships and Grants, GSAS Dean, Higher Ed, NEH

Margaret Yardley Fellowship Opportunity

Female graduate students who are residents of New Jersey, look into this opportunity from NJ State Federation of Women’s Clubs of GFWC.

Deadline: March 1, 2017

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$1,000 fellowship granted annually to a female graduate student. Must be a resident of New Jersey, active in a graduate program (in AY 17-18), and have financial need. The award is granted annually to a deserving woman who is a graduate student doing advanced work in a special field of study. For more information on the fellowship and instudctions on how to apply visit the NJSFWC website.

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Filed under Fellowships and Grants, Funding, Professional Development, Uncategorized

Smithsonian Libraries Research Opportunities 2017-18

Hey students! Check out this fellowship opportunity from the Smithsonian!

Deadline January 15, 2017

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Smithsonian Libraries – Opportunities for Research 2017-2018
The Smithsonian Libraries, situated at the center of the world’s largest museum complex, is a vital part of the research, exhibition, and educational enterprise of the Institution. The Libraries offers exceptional research resources ranging from 13th-century manuscripts to electronic journals. We are happy to offer the following fellowship opportunities for the 2017-2018 academic year.

The Baird Society Resident Scholar Program: $3,500 per month for up to six months to support scholarly research in the Special Collections of the Smithsonian Libraries in Washington, D.C. and New York, NY, in an extensive range of subject areas. Doctoral students and post-doctoral scholars are welcome to apply. Collections include printed materials on world’s fairs; manufacturer’s commercial trade catalogs from the 19th and 20th centuries; natural history rare books (pre-1840 works on topics such as botany, zoology, travel & exploration, museums & collecting, geology, and anthropology); air and space history (late 18th to early 20th centuries); James Smithson’s library; rare materials in European and American decorative arts, architecture, and design (18th to 20th centuries); and history of art and artists (exhibition catalogs, catalogues raisonnés, serials, dissertations and artists’ ephemera).

The Dibner Library Resident Scholar Program: $3,500 per month for up to six months for individuals working on a topic relating to the history of science and technology who can make substantial use of the Dibner Library’s Special Collections in Washington, D.C. Doctoral students and post-doctoral scholars are welcome to apply. The Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology has manuscripts and rare books dating primarily from the 15th to the 19th centuries. Collection strengths are in the fields of mathematics, astronomy, classical natural philosophy, theoretical physics (up to the early 20th century), experimental physics (especially electricity and magnetism), engineering technology (from the Renaissance to the late nineteenth century), and scientific apparatus and instruments.

The deadline for all programs is January 15, 2017 for appointments between September 1, 2017 and August 31, 2018. Fellowship recipients are expected to be in residence during their appointments. For further information about the Smithsonian Libraries’ Resident Scholar Programs listed above, including application information, visit the Smithsonian web site.

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Filed under Fellowships and Grants, Funding, GSAS Futures, Professional Development, Uncategorized

NEH Postdoctoral/Predoctoral Fellowship and Program Opportunities

Advanced Ph.D.s and soon to be Alums– look into these great opportunities from the Omohundro Institute sponsored by the NEH!

Postdoctoral Fellowship Deadline: October 31, 2016

Scholars’ Workshop Deadline: January 23, 2017

Georgian Papers Programme Deadline: November 7, 2016, February 20, 2017, & May 8, 2017

Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation Short-Term Visiting Fellowship Deadline: April 17, 2017

Lapidus-Omohundro Predoctoral Fellowship Deadline: January 16, 2017

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The Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture is an1 independant research organization housed at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. They offer long-term, short-term, and travel fellowships to scholars at the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels. All application materials and complete information can be found on their website under fellowships.

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Filed under Fellowships and Grants, Funding, GSAS Futures, Professional Development