Why a Professional Support Network is Important

Sitting on the RamVan recently, I was surround by Gabelli undergraduates (I could tell because one of them was dressed in a three-piece suit). All of them were discussing internships– how they got them, where they’re interviewing, how they’re prepping– and the benefits and drawbacks of various placements.

And it got me thinking… I don’t remember that kind of practical sharing and support as an graduate student here. That’s not to say that those of us in the humanities or social sciences don’t support one another, but I think we want to do so as scholars. We talk about our research interests or intellectual theories and discuss mentors and academic experiences. I think it is less natural for us to automatically jump to talk about jobs and careers.

A lot of that worry stems from our feeling that we’re impostors– academic frauds who are not as worthy or as knowledgeable as our colleagues (check out this great overview of impostor syndrome from CalTech). If we are anxious and less-than in the classroom, how much farther behind are we on the job market? What can we offer?

But the best part of the conversation going on around me on the van yesterday wasn’t the interviewing tips (honestly they were nothing special) but how relieved the students sounded after explaining their anxieties. They bounced ideas off of each other and were open about how much work they had and the pressure they were all feeling to succeed.

We all have to work hard. And while I think that in grad school, working hard is normalized and working “for” the degree is expected, in my experience most students also want to be the naturally quick and intelligent person. We want to skim, not have to read the book; understand the problem sets in class the first time; write a dissertation chapter quickly– we want to have the answers, not admit that we’re worried we may have the wrong ones.

But asking the question, admitting gaps in our knowledge and confidence, is just as important, especially if you can do so within a trusted peer group. As summer approaches and things calm down, many people us the break to reconnect with research partners or cohort members– if you can, also use it as a time to discuss anxieties or talk through problems. You might be surprised that your peers are struggling with the same issues.

  • Dewis Shallcross, Director of Student Development, GSAS ‘14

 

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TOMORROW! Queer Encoding: Encoding Diverse Identities

When: Friday, April 28 at 10:30 AM – 5.00 PM
Location: NYU Center for the Humanities, 20 Cooper Square, Fifth Floor
More info & RSVP

Come and hear leading practitioners in the field talk about how we might work creatively with textual mark-up languages to be more inclusive, and see strategies in action in the Project Hack.

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Keynote speakers:

Julia Flanders (Digital Scholarship Group, Northeastern University), ‘Encoding Identity’

Marcus Bingenheimer, (Department of Religion, Temple University), ‘Using TEI to Encode the History of Chinese Buddhism’

Project Hack:
Katherine Briant and Stephen Powell (Fordham University, MA Center for Medieval Studies), Queerness of Space Time and Text in the Independent Crusaders Mapping Project

Sohini Chattopadhyay and Benjamin Hiebert (Columbia University), Queer Encoding Challenges in The Making and Knowing Project (http://www.makingandknowing.org/)

Cherrie Kwok and Nicole Cote (New York University), Queer Encoding and Identity Formation in the Nineteenth-Century Manuscript Diary

Moderators: Marion Thain (New York University) and Peter Logan (Temple University)

Co-Sponsors: NYU Digital Humanities; Digital Scholarship Center, Temple University; Fordham Digital Humanities Group, and Office of Research.

More info & RSVP

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Bio Opportunity (FREE)- Attend The Whole Scientist Course!

Biology/Science students! Attend The Whole Scientist course to build skills for your career

Events: April 20, 2017 (NYC) and May 15-19, 2017 (Maine)

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Am I prepared for the next step in my scientific career? What skills do I need to work in academia? Industry? Other careers? What if I don’t want to do research? How can I find a job?

The Jackson Laboratory and partners are pleased to host The Whole Scientist workshop in New York on April 20, and in Bar Harbor, Maine, on May 15-19, 2017.

The Whole Scientist will assist you in answering the questions above and helps scientists like you prepare for the next step. With advice from leading experts, The Whole Scientist will instill skills and confidence in:

  • People and project management
  • Individual Develop Plan preparation and execution
  • Mentorship and team-building
  • Networking and negotiating
  • Effective communication to a variety of audiences
  • Career exploration and the job market

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Get ready for your future at one of our two upcoming events!

– Join us at Hunter College in New York City for our one-day workshop on April 20, 2017. Find out more and register. Registration is FREE and includes breakfast and lunch!

AND/OR

– Join us at The Jackson Laboratory in beautiful Bar Harbor, Maine, for our week-long course May 15-19, 2017. Find out more and register. Comprehensive scholarship packages are available to attend. Register today!

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Channeling Our Creative Powers

Malkah Bressler is a Ph.D. candidate in English at Fordham University and a participant in the “Living Humanities” PhD in the 21st Century” Project. She participated in the MLA’s 2015-2016 inaugural Connected Academics Proseminar. The following post is a reflection on the planning theme of the fifth meeting of the project, “Mentor the Whole Person: Career-Wise Counsel, Promising Partnerships. For a fuller overview of the meeting, see the companion post by Samantha Sabalis.

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When I was writing my BA thesis, I told my advisor that I was considering a PhD in English Literature. Without missing a beat, Lisa said “well, you certainly have the creativity.” It struck me as odd that my advisor valued creativity first before intellectual engagement and writing acumen. Creativity appeared to belong to the realm of creative writing and poetry and not to the analysis of books and poems. As I pursued my graduate education, however, both my MA and doctoral studies have revealed that Lisa is right; it is our uniqueness of thought and our ability to connect disparate texts and theories that attracts us to the academic life. As I write my dissertation, it is those moments when I “realize” something, when I make a connection, that fill me with a rush of joyful exuberance.

That “spark” of realization is, I think, the major impetus that propels us to dedicated six to ten years of our lives to the study of the humanities. The creativity we enjoy even extends to our teaching practice, crafting an argument, and creating elegant prose. Creativity is at the heart of everything we do except for one, very important factor of the graduate education: the inescapable job search. Why does our profession, at the moment when a student is deemed ready for the degree, contract and direct that student to the most expected and uncreative outcome?

Although it has never been the case that all people with PhDs assume a professorship, the narrative that doctoral candidates apply for and enter in to tenure track jobs has been ingrained into the collective psyche of the academy as well as that of non-academics. Anne Krook rightly observes that the more time a student has spent in graduate school, the more fixed this outcome appears. Isn’t it strange? The more a student hones her ability to think creatively, the more she cleaves to a specific and expected path.

These days, we have realized that not every graduate student will or wants to become a professor, and we are developing methods to help graduate students find meaningful professions. Krook and many others have offered useful tasks that students, faculties, departments, and graduate schools can do to refocus their vision of post-graduate life. Suggestions include inviting those who have left academia to talk about their jobs, educating graduate students on the current state of the academic job market, offering graduate students the opportunity to conduct projects and internships that will build new skills, and of course, changing the mindset of students and faculty who are not wholly in favor of these new measures. As my colleague Samantha Sabalis mentions in her companion blog piece, several graduate departments at Fordham have already implemented programs and have created resources to help graduate students. At both the micro and the macro levels, there is a collective effort.

But I think we are missing the linchpin to this entire issue: although all of these fixes help, the only way to ensure lasting success is for us to constantly apply our creativity. As Katina Rogers argues “I think that the discipline of the humanities should be disentangled—or, unbound—from the rigid academic pathway leading to the single goal of the tenure track job.” The “unboundedness” that Rogers identifies is an invitation for us to take our creative powers and use them to help graduate students discover various professions and the manifold ways in which a student can find meaningful employment.

Allow me to offer an example.

Not all graduate students want to teach; many value the doctoral education for the training in writing and researching. Obviously, these students need something different than exposure to non-academic teaching opportunities, but students are easily discouraged by not knowing how to begin. I think that this moment is an invitation to think creatively. A student might start by side-stepping the issue. For example, the student might ask herself “what topics do I enjoy researching?” When I asked myself this question, I realized that I enjoy writing about the connections between the environment and culture, and then I conducted a Google search for like-minded publications and organizations.

As I push further with this notion of creativity, I am reminded that Krook suggests that students write companion pieces to their dissertation chapters that are tailored for a non-academic audience. The goal is for students to demonstrate their ability to write in both academic and non-academic prose. But how do graduate students ensure that potential employers become aware of their abilities? Most graduate students know of the utility in maintaining a professional website that features teaching practices and dissertation updates. Why not add a section on non-academic writing?

Finding the advertisements for non-academic jobs seems painfully difficult, but the angst can be ameliorated when the student becomes imaginative. Of course networking with alumni promises the most success in terms of gaining a job, but before that, a student needs to know what to look for in a potential alumni interviewee. Recently, a friend mentioned interest in becoming an editor but was wary of publishing houses. As we considered what other organizations require editors, we both recalled a recent article in The Atlantic that was written by an employee of the Brookings Institution. It suddenly dawned upon us that organizations like the Brookings Institution, the World Bank, and the IMF employ in-house editors to review manuscripts that are later published in a variety of print and on-line publications.

Taking this creative thinking one step further, it dawned upon us how similar finding non-academic employment is to our research methodology. We begin our research by identifying a seminal scholarly text, and then we build our bibliographical arsenal by finding and reading texts that cite the initial work. We must approach the non-academic job search in a similar fashion. For example, once a student identifies a prospective employer, the student should review the biographies of employees, paying close attention to their past employment. From one website, the student will glean perhaps three or four others institutions to consider as well as an idea of whom to contact for an informational interview. We academics excel at these sorts of sleuthing exercises. It is how we find forgotten texts, it is how we find that one last article we need to read before we can finish writing, and it is how we find a dissertation or article topic that has yet to be explored.

We must unbind our creativity and let it thrive as we help students find their next career path. In doing so, we will ensure that the job search remains fluid and open, and we will avoid calcification. Embarking upon the search for non-academic professions is very much like that moment when we ask ourselves “what shall I research and write about next?” and feel a rush of excitement as we anticipate learning something new and writing something not yet said. If we keep our creativity close to mind, we will find the freedom to discover so many more opportunities and even, create new ones for our peers and students.

  • Malkah Bressler, Ph.D. Candidate in English, Fordham University

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Mentor the Whole Person Blog Post: Every Ph.D. Needs an Exit Strategy

A soon-to-be English Ph.D. comes across a recent graduate studying in the library stacks. One is finishing her dissertation and excited to be nearing the end of the process. The other? Well, the euphoria from the defense is dissipating. When you’re adjuncting at the same university for less money than you made as a graduate student and you’re diligently trying for job after job (in academia, in publishing, in writing…) with little to show for it, you can start to wonder: what can I do with a Ph.D.?

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This little graduate school morality play may seem a little bleak, but the thing is, you can actually do a lot with a Ph.D. In “Humanities Unbound,” a survey of humanities Ph.D. graduates working in “alternative academic” positions, Katina Rogers found that respondents had gone on to find careers in the fields of academic administration, government, and journalism, or worked at institutions like cultural heritage organizations, libraries, or non-profits. And while we’ve all heard horror stories about needing to take the Ph.D. off a resume to be more hirable, in fact many employers value a Ph.D. in a job candidate. Several employers interviewed as part of the Pathways Through Graduate School study by the Educational Testing Service and the Council of Graduate Schools saw candidates with graduate degrees as having not only advanced knowledge, but also the ability to lead, design projects, and problem-solve in innovative ways.

So why do so many Ph.D.s struggle to find stable work upon graduation? Some certainly take positions as adjuncts to persevere with the dream of a tenure-track academic job (a separate issue, recently devastatingly summed up by Kevin Birmingham), but many others simply don’t know what else to do. It’s possible to leave a Ph.D. with a polished dissertation, a teaching portfolio, and selection of well-crafted cover letters for academic jobs, but with no resume, no contacts outside academia, and no idea of what jobs you’re qualified for. It’s also difficult for many Ph.D.s to articulate their many skills for employers beyond the content of their dissertation and teaching. For example, few non-academic employers will value my deep knowledge of fifteenth-century religious education and how to revise comma splices, but they could certainly appreciate my grant-writing techniques, my proficiency as a researcher, and my ability to set goals and work independently to reach them.

What every Ph.D. student needs to create, preferably before the frantic last lap of the dissertation process, is an exit strategy. This plan goes beyond writing a strong resume (though that’s a great start). Students should be able to name a couple of career paths they’d like to pursue, and should have conducted research into the vocabulary and required skills for these fields. They should talk to Ph.D. alumni, explore internships, sit down with employees in these potential careers, write for audiences outside academia…the list goes on. Basically, every student should start thinking about what he or she wants do after graduation long before finishing the Ph.D., even if the main goal is an elusive tenure-track job.

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At the recent meeting of the “Living Humanities” Ph.D. project on “Mentor the Whole Person: Career-Wise Counsel, Promising Partnerships,” faculty members and administrators from different departments across the humanities shared their initiatives to help students prepare for careers after graduation. These insights highlighted several avenues for improving graduates’ confidence on entering a non-academic job market. One suggestion involved expanding the role of the placement officer to include non-academic careers. In the Philosophy department, a member of faculty now works on enhancing non-academic placement, while the placement officer focuses on academic appointments. In the English department, the placement officer is now assisted by a Job Placement Committee, who can draw on a wider range of teaching (and life) experience to assist students on the job market.

Several departments are focusing on expanding their students’ teaching skills. In Philosophy, there are plans to hold a summer camp for high schoolers, so Ph.D. students will have the opportunity to work in K-12 teaching. In English, the placement officer is working to prepare students for careers at community colleges, independent high schools and beyond. Discussions with English Ph.D. alumni in the Peace Corps and the Park Service have highlighted how their employers valued their teaching experience, so focusing on this aspect of the Ph.D. could also help students answer questions about the value of their Ph.D. on the non-academic market.

Another key factor is not only normalizing non-academic jobs, but also raising their prestige among faculty members. Of course departments should still promote their graduates’ achievements on the academic job market, but they should also highlight that a tenure-track academic job is not the norm; more students will find careers outside this category than within it. One goal in the Theology department is to teach faculty to see non-academic jobs as equally attractive, so that this perception could also trickle down to students and pervade departmental culture. Departments can easily contribute to the valuing of non-academic careers by promoting students’ achievements from outside the academy as well as within it. Why not send out a congratulatory email with the list of students who received competitive internships or post links to articles students have written for non-academic publications?
Another way to demonstrate a commitment to non-academic positions as well as academic ones is to Invite alumni in exciting careers back to the department to speak to current students about their jobs and how they got them. Students can then get ideas for what to look for, and will feel encouraged to take the initiative and search for opportunities on their own.

Alumni in particular are an excellent resource, offering tangible proof of the many careers a Ph.D. can lead to. As well as showing how to market a Ph.D. for a variety of careers, alumni can also provide that oh-so-elusive quantity for many Ph.D. students – professional contacts outside academia. Many departments currently don’t track their alumni working in careers outside academia, even as they meticulously list which graduates hold postdoctoral fellowships or academic positions. But Jason Pedicone, President of the Paideia Institute and a guest speaker at the last “Living Humanities” Ph.D. meeting, emphasizes the value of talking to alumni and showcasing their career paths. The Legion Project, a Paideia initiative that tracks students who pursued advanced degrees in Classics and publicizes their current careers, not only shows what can be done with an advanced education in Classics, but also helps create a community that Ph.D. students and graduates can tap into. Such projects can also be aspirational for students. For instance, the series of Compatible Careers seminars held by Fordham’s Medieval Studies program, at which former Medieval Studies MAs discuss their current careers, not only provides insight into the range of jobs available to graduates but also shows students that getting such jobs is possible, and that their skills from graduate school have value outside the academy.

So if you’re a graduate student, whether a starry-eyed first year or a world-weary dissertator, take some time to brainstorm what you’d like to do after graduation. Research how you could prepare yourself for this coveted career, be it with an internship, an informational interview, or a plan to publish in an online magazine. If you’re a faculty member, think about reaching out to former dissertation mentees – are they all in academia, or have some found fulfilling careers elsewhere? As the soon-to-be Ph.D. at the start of this piece, I’m trying to follow my own advice – as I prepare myself for my defense, I’m also thinking about what I’ll do next.

  • Samantha Sabalis, Graduate Assistant, NEH/GSAS Grant, The “Living Humanities” Ph.D. for the 21st Century 

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For more about the “Mentor the Whole Person” planning theme and suggestions for further reading, see its description on the website for “The ‘Living Humanities’ Ph.D. for the 21st Century.”

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Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows Opportunity

Humanities Ph.D.s about to graduate look at this great opportunity! Recent alums take notice too!

Deadline: March 22, 2017

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ACLS is pleased to announce the seventh annual Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows competition. In 2017, the program will place up to 22 recent humanities PhDs in two-year positions at top nonprofit and government agencies. Public Fellows will participate in the core work of these partner organizations while benefiting from professional mentoring and other career building opportunities. Each fellowship carries a stipend of $67,500 per year, as well as individual health insurance and $3,000 toward professional development activities. Applicants must possess US citizenship or permanent resident status and have a PhD in the humanities or humanistic social sciences conferred between September 1, 2013, and June 18, 2017, and will have defended and deposited their dissertations no later than April 6, 2017.

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Further information about the application process, eligibility criteria, and this year’s fellowship positions is available here. All applications must be submitted through ACLS’s online application system by 8 pm EDT on March 22, 2017. Questions about the program may be addressed to publicfellows@acls.org.

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FYI Announcement- ProQuest Launches Displaced Researchers Program

Faculty or students who are affected by the recent travel ban (or know a fellow scholar who is) please note and share the following information.

ProQuest, one of the library’s biggest vendors, has initiated a program to assist displaced scholars.

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ANN ARBOR, MI, February 9, 2017 – ProQuest has launched a program to provide no-cost access to its databases for students and researchers who have been separated from their universities and libraries because of travel bans or other immigration changes. The company has an email hotline ContinueMyResearch@proquest.com where these displaced researchers can arrange for access to the materials they need to continue their work.

“ProQuest is an open and inclusive organization that takes its role in supporting research and learning very seriously,” said Kurt Sanford, ProQuest CEO. “We’re doing whatever we can to mitigate the interruptions facing our community of students and scholars around the world.”

The program resolves authentication problems displaced researchers may face when trying to access to their institution’s holdings remotely. Individuals will be provided with personal credentials, as well as direct access to ProQuest support teams for help. There is no limit to the number of databases that can be requested. Free RefWorks accounts are also available to help with long-distance collaboration and to save, manage and organize their work.

To request access, students, faculty and other researchers can email ProQuest at ContinueMyResearch@proquest.com with the name of the university or library they have been separated from, along with the name of their research supervisor or faculty advisor. ProQuest representatives will work directly with impacted individuals or their advisors to set up online, no cost access to all databases needed to continue their studies or research.

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For more information please see the announcement on their site.

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EVENT!- Teaching All Learners in Higher Education

The Faculty Working Group on Disability
presents:

Teaching All Learners in Higher Education

By Marilyn Bisberg
Fordham University, Graduate School of Education

Wednesday March 1st, 2017
3:00 pm to 4:30 pm

Information: The seminar will be in RH (Hughes Hall 212) and in LC (Lowenstein 708) linked by videoconference. Space is limited. Refreshments will be served. The speaker will be in RH. Feel free to forward this invitation to others who might be interested.

Please RSVP by Wednesday February 22nd at this link and contact us for any disability access or accommodation question at disabilitycluster@fordham.edu .

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Abstract: We want to make sure that each student in our class learns. It take some planning on our part to teach our diverse learners. This seminar will take a look at ideas, strategies and requirements that work… and some that don’t work.

Speaker: Marilyn Bisberg is Associate Professor at the Fordham Graduate School of Education. Her teaching interests and expertise are in the areas of behavior management strategies, emotional development of young children, attachment and separation, underserved children/families and assessment.

This is part of the Fordham University Seminar on Disability Research across Disciplines, a seminar series organized by the Faculty Working Group on Disability and funded by the Provost Office.

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Communicating Science (ComSciCon) Workshop- Fully-Funded Opportunity!

All graduate students in STEM and related fields look at this great opportunity to present your research!

Deadline: March 1st

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Applications are still open for ComSciCon 2017, the 5th annual Communicating Science workshop, to be held in Cambridge, MA on June 8-10th 2017. Graduate students at U.S. institutions in all fields of science, technology, engineering, health, mathematics, and related fields are encouraged to apply. The application closes on March 1st.

Acceptance to the workshop is competitive; attendance is free and travel support and lodging will be provided to accepted applicants.

Participants will build the communication skills that scientists and other technical professionals need to express complex ideas to the general public, experts in other fields, and their peers. In additional to panel discussions (on topics such as Media and Journalism, Science Advocacy, and Diversity in Science Communication), ample time is allotted for networking with science communication experts and developing science outreach collaborations with fellow graduate students.

You can follow the link below to submit an application or learn more about our workshop programs and participants. You can also follow us on Twitter (@comscicon) and use #comscicon17 ! If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at comscicon17@comscicon.org.

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Learn More and Apply
We look forward to your application!

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ComSciCon is sponsored by Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of Colorado Boulder, American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Astronomical Society, American Chemical Society, The Optical Society, IOP Publishing, and the American Institute of Physics.

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Transformation, Not Replication: Training the Next Generation of Doctoral Students

Is it possible to “unlearn” something? This was one of the main questions at the recent meeting of the “Living Humanities” Ph.D. for the 21st Century project, focusing on the planning theme “Inhabit the New Learning Ecosystem.”

This term comes from Cathy Davidson’s Now You See It: How Technology and Brain Science Will Transform Schools and Business for the 21st Century, in which she draws from Alvin Toffler to suggest that “the key literacy skill of the twenty-first century is the ability to learn, unlearn, and relearn” (12). Some participants scoffed at this description, seeing it as old hat. Don’t we do this in our classrooms every day? Isn’t this a skill that dates back to Plato? But perhaps this idea bears repeating – in adapting doctoral programs to suit a twenty-first century learning ecosystem, we need to let go of old assumptions.

 
One of these assumptions is that every Ph.D. graduate will go into a tenure-track academic faculty position (or that every student enters a Ph.D aspiring to this career). Today’s Ph.D. graduates are grappling with a much larger job market. While many candidates still make the tenure-track professorship their primary goal, others focus more on so-called “alternative academic” careers (alt-ac) or careers outside the academy altogether in non-profits, museums, government, or business, among others.

A second assumption is that incoming doctoral students will learn and conduct their scholarship in the same ways that their professors did. The constantly evolving digital and informational landscape means that students have new avenues to acquire knowledge, from the internet to MOOCs, as well as new systems of learning. One professor noted that he finds it harder and harder to find cultural parallels with his students, and feels that he is forcing them to use his systems of learning rather than the ones they have grown up with.

 
So how can we adapt doctoral programs in the humanities to accommodate more career outcomes? One suggestion is to talk to Ph.D. graduates who have gone to other careers. In “Graduate Education Reconsidered,” James Grossman and Emily Swafford of the American Historical Association (and members of the “Living Humanities” Ph.D. project) mention asking alumni from History Ph.D.s working outside the academy what they wished they had learned during their degrees. They found five areas to address that could easily benefit students going into academic careers as well: “communication beyond the scholarly and classroom modes, collaboration, quantitative literacy, intellectual self-confidence, and digital literacy/engagement.”

Among these five areas, communication stands out. At the meeting, several participants emphasized the need for Ph.D. students to address different publics both inside and outside academia. They saw this skill not only as a way for students to advocate for themselves and highlight their skills to employers, but also as a means of promoting Ph.D. study in the humanities more generally. Ph.D. alumni working outside the academy could become strong ambassadors for their disciplines, communicating what they achieved in their degrees to a much broader audience.

Participants had many suggestions about incorporating more career outcomes into Ph.D. programs, but they were less certain about how to engage students who were accustomed to learning through primarily digital means. So how can doctoral programs adapt to engage these students? Some participants were skeptical about making big changes at a time when digital tools are changing so frequently. What if we adopt something that turns out to be a passing trend? How do we maintain our traditions and standards of excellence while also staying current?

The general consensus seemed to be that we have to be willing to change, to unlearn outdated methods and try new ones (even if they might not last). But participants also highlighted elements of doctoral education that still remain constant. The key skills of mastery and manipulation are still key to learning, even if they are being done differently in our digital age. Moreover, some of the functions of studying the humanities still stay the same. They can still tell us how we got to where we are today, creating a “living archive” that makes the past current, and they still offer self-knowledge to those who study them.

 
Through the process of unlearning, perhaps we can let go of old assumptions about what Ph.D. students want to do and how they want to learn to create doctoral programs that will best serve new generations of students. As the MLA Task Force on Doctoral Study in Modern Language and Literature puts it in their 2014 report, we should encourage “a shift from a narrative of replication, in which students imitate their mentors, to one of transformation, since graduate programs should be centered on students’ diverse learning and career development needs.”

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For more about the “Inhabit the New Learning Ecosystem” planning theme and suggestions for further reading, see its description on the website for “The ‘Living Humanities’ Ph.D. for the 21st Century.” To learn more about the meeting itself, read the full discussion in the official minutes.

  • Samantha Sabalis, Graduate Assistant, NEH/GSAS Grant, The “Living Humanities” Ph.D. for the 21st Century

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